TechnicalJobSearch.com
what where jobs by Indeed job search
Menu vertical line
what
where
jobs by Indeed job search
Interview Center
Resume and Letter Center
You are Here: Home > Career Guidance > Career Networking Center > Networking Tips - 2

Networking Tips

Brought to you by ResumeEdge — the premier resume writing and editing service on the Web.ResumeEdge Professional Resume Writing

Networking Knows No Boundaries

Business conferences, informational interviews, college reunions, and cocktail parties are obvious networking opportunities. You expect to walk away with a few business cards and some recommendations for potential Rolodex entries.

But the reality is that invaluable contacts and enviable opportunities often surprise us. Good networkers are flexible people who approach connection-making as a fluid enterprise that extends far beyond hotel conference room walls.

You never know who will step onto the adjacent elliptical trainer at the gym; who will be parked behind you in an interminable grocery store line; who will sit next to you on an airplane; or who will be under the hair dryer next to you at the beauty salon.

Don't let these opportunities pass you by. While it may have been sheer luck that you bumped into an affable CEO, your savvy approach to networking can turn a banal exchange into a pivotal moment in your career path.

Always be ready to make a contact and exchange business cards. Remember, don't hesitate to network with someone who has no obvious connection to your ambitions: Your new contact may be able to give you relevant names of his or her friends and colleagues.

Follow Up After Networking

After you meet with a contact, it is absolutely essential to write a thank you note. Tell your contact how much he or she helped you, and refer to particularly helpful, specific advice. Everyone, even the most high-level executive, likes to feel appreciated.

In addition to immediate follow-up after a meeting or conversation, keep in touch with your contacts. This way, they may think of you if an opportunity comes up, and they will also be forthcoming with new advice. It's important to stay on their radar screens without being imposing or invasive. Of course, if you get that new job, be sure to tell them and thank them again for their help.

What Goes Around Comes Around

If you want to be treated with respect, treat others with respect. If you want your phone calls and email missives returned, call and write back to the people who contact you. If you want big-wigs to make time for you, make yourself available to others whom you might be able to help out. It's that simple.

The higher up you climb in the professional world, the more you'll find that everyone knows everyone else. Thus, if you're impolite, curt, condescending, or disposed to burning bridges, you'll cultivate a reputation that will serve as a constant obstacle. Remember, the people who seem little now might one day be running companies and making decisions. If you treated them with kindness and respect when they were green, they'll remember and return the favor later.

Make It Easy For Your Networking Contacts

When you call, meet with, or write to a potential contact, make it as easy as possible for them to help you. Explain what you specifically want, and ask detail-oriented questions.

For example, "I'm looking for jobs in arts administration. Do you know anyone who works at the Arts Council? May I have their names and phone numbers? May I use your name when I introduce myself to them?" Another entree into a productive conversation is to solicit career tips and advice from your contact. Most people love to talk about themselves. By asking for your contact to offer valuable insight from his or her personal experiences and successes, he or she will feel important and respected. Who doesn't like to feel like an expert?

Be sure to avoid making general demands, such as, "Do you know of any jobs that would be good for me?" This sort of question is overwhelming and it puts an undue burden on your contact. 

Stay Organized When Networking

Keep a record of your networking. Whether you do this in a Rolodex, in a notebook, or in a database file on your computer, it's important to keep track of your contacts. Make sure your system has plenty of room for contacts' names, addresses, phone numbers, companies, job titles, how you met them, and subsequent conversations you've had with them.

Let ResumeEdgeResumeEdge Professional Resume Writing give your resume and cover letter an edge!

Networking Tips
Page > 1 ● 2

Custom Search
Job Interview Coaching Service

Get a Resume that Lands Interviews!
Do not copy content from this or any page. Plagiarism will be detected by Copyscape. See copyright notice below.
line
Copyright Notice - Click for more information